Pop goes the weasel

Bob Alba and Ann Fishel: What is the meaning of the children's rhyme Pop goes the weasel?
Patrick Swanson: "Pop goes the weasel" comes from Cockney rhyming slang. The "pop shop" was the pawnbroker. When the money ran out at the end of the week (a penny for a loaf of bread, a penny for a needle, and maybe a bit more for rice and treacle), the prize possession of a warm winter coat (weasel and stoat=coat) was taken down to the "pop" shop and left as security until the week's wage came in when it would be redeemed, and the cycle began again.

Terry O'Connor: The full rhyme, if I remember it correctly, goes:

Half a pound of tuppenny rice
Half a pound of treacle
That's the way the money goes
Pop goes the weasel.

Up and down the City Road
In and out of The Eagle
That's the way the money goes
Pop goes the weasel.


"The Eagle", of course, was a pub. Anyone know of more verses?

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