Time terms
wally5757

The words time, second, minute, hour, day, week, month, year, decade and century, along with noon, dusk, dawn, etc., all being so tightly associated, must have a common origin, I presume, but I can't find any of their first uses. Can anyone point me to a source of reference?
AdSumADS
The dictionary seems to have origins on each of the words you've listed. I don't see them as being particularly closely related, etymologically. To follow are excerpts of Miriam-Websters entries.

Main Entry: 1time
Pronunciation: 'tIm
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tIma; akin to Old Norse tImi time, Old English tId -- more at TIDE
Date: before 12th century

Main Entry: 3second
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English secunde, from Medieval Latin secunda, from Latin, feminine of secundus second; from its being the second sexagesimal division of a unit, as a minute is the first
Date: 14th century

Main Entry: 1min·ute
Pronunciation: 'mi-n&t
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin minuta, from Latin minutus small, from past participle of minuere to lessen -- more at MINOR
Date: 14th century

Main Entry: hour
Pronunciation: 'au(-& r
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old French heure, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin hora canonical hour, from Latin, hour of the day, from Greek hOra -- more at YEAR
Date: 13th century

Main Entry: day
Pronunciation: 'dA
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dæg; akin to Old High German tag day
Date: before 12th century

Main Entry: week
Pronunciation: 'wEk
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English weke, from Old English wicu, wucu; akin to Old High German wehha week and perhaps to Latin vicis change, alternation, Old High German wehsal exchange
Date: before 12th century

Main Entry: month
Pronunciation: 'm&n(t)th
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural months /'m&n(t)s, 'm&n(t)ths/
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mOnath; akin to Old High German mAnOd month, Old English mOna moon
Date: before 12th century

Main Entry: year
Pronunciation: 'yir
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English yere, from Old English gEar; akin to Old High German jAr year, Greek hOros year, hOra season, hour
Date: before 12th century

Main Entry: de·cade
Pronunciation: 'de-"kAd, de-'kAd; esp sense 1b 'de-k&d
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French décade, from Late Latin decad-, decas, from Greek dekad-, dekas, from deka
Date: 15th century

Main Entry: cen·tu·ry
Pronunciation: 'sen(t)-sh(&-)rE
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
Etymology: Latin centuria, irregular from centum hundred
Date: 1533

Main Entry: noon
Pronunciation: 'nün
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English nOn ninth hour from sunrise, from Latin nona, from feminine of nonus ninth; akin to Latin novem nine -- more at NINE
Date: 13th century

Main Entry: 3dusk

Pronunciation: 'd&sk

Function: adjective

Etymology: Middle English dosk, alteration of Old English dox; akin to Latin fuscus dark brown, Old English dunn dun, dust dust

Date: 1622

Main Entry: 1dawn
Pronunciation: 'don, 'dän
Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: Middle English, probably back-formation from dawning daybreak, alteration of dawing, from Old English dagung, from dagian
Date: 15th century

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