Lolly column
Templeton
Can anyone tell me where this term originated? I've looked and searched and can find only definitions for its construction and use but, not where or how the term came into use.
Lewis Joplin II
I am an American and am not familiar with this expression. Is it "lolly" as in money? Lolly meaning money may come from "the Romany word 'loli,' meaning red, used by gypsies to mean copper coins, and hence money in general. It is perhaps easier to derive the word from lolly, meaning sweet or candy which itself originated in dialect with the meaning of tongue...historically related to the verb to loll. (The sense of lollipop is later.)..." From the "British English from A to Zed" by Norman Schur (FirstHarperPerennial edition, 1991).
Templeton
A lolly column is a support column used in building. In our barn, they are the columns in the basement (lower level) that support the upper stories. I have found reference to lolly columns in many construction and building entries on the web but, none have indicated where the term lolly column originated. I ran across a definition for loll meaning dangle but, I didn't think that applied.

Thanks for your response...perhaps with this new information, someone else will have a clue about its origin.

AdSumADS
"Lolly," qua, "tongue" derives onomatopútically for the mouth sounds (and suggestive of the motions during the act of pronouncing) associated with, in particular, sucking or licking confections. Hard candy on a stick would thus be called a "lollipop," and "lolly" an abbreviation for same, the lingual sementic becoming archaic.

A "lolly column" is an added, vertical support for a beam used to correct for defects that develop in the floor joists it supports. Structurally critical, then, it does not dangle. Reckon, the connection responsible for that naming stems from it resembling a lollipop's stick; the diminutive/understatement disclosing it's nature as an ersatz solution outside the intended design, though it does happen to alliterate with "lift" and "level."

Templeton
Thanks. It's an interesting train of thought. However, I'm still curious as the term's origins and hope another member or passerby can shed some light on the term's origins.
AtoZ
The above is interesting conjecture, but what is often called a "lolly column" is really a "Lally column" -- "Lally" being the trademark.

... but as to where and when Lally developed the column... maybe someone out there knows.

AtoZ
The above is interesting conjecture, but what is often called a "lolly column" is really a "Lally column" -- "Lally" being the trademark.

... but as to where and when Lally developed the column... maybe someone out there knows.

AtoZ
Found him!

John Lally, born in Kilbanon, County Galway, Ireland in 1859 was the inventor of the Lally column, a steel tube filled with concrete, used for portable structural support in building construction. These were manufactured by the Lally Column Co. His wife, Mary Ellen Lally wrote a brief biography titled "Lally".

Templeton
AtoZ,

Thank you for sharing the fruits of your persistence.

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