beating a dead horse
fyndorian
nothing like using an idiom but that isn't the question....i'm going to answer the 'whole 9 yards' thing cuz you don't have the right answer....it predates prison yards and ships and the like....remember the phrase 'full tilt' as in meaning to go forward? the phrase was a fractured form of 'full kilt' and yes, the phrases are related. The whole 9 yards went back to the early Scots. Their kilts were worn in either the 'dress' mode or 'everyday' mode. When worn as 'dress' the plaid was 9 yards long when including the part that used to wrap wrapped around and then over the shoulder. To wear or 'go' the 'whole 9 yards' mean to go all out to impress or better yet, to intimidate with either stature or wealth.
ularry
I was told the expression came from the ammo belts used during WWII in US fighter aircraft. They were 9 yeareds long. When a returning fighter was asked by his crew chief how harrowing the mission was, he would respond that I used "The whole nine yards" if he ran out of bullets.
ularry
I was told the expression came from the ammo belts used during WWII in US fighter aircraft. They were 9 yards long. When a returning fighter was asked by his crew chief how harrowing the mission was, he would respond that I used "The whole nine yards" if he ran out of bullets.
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